Pastor Kevin Sanders

"He must increase, but I must decrease." -John 3:30

Tag: Preaching

My First Year: Confessions of an Ordinary Pastor

Most of the pastors I know took fairly similar vocational paths. They began by doing youth ministry or preaching (at small churches) in their early twenties, usually while working on their seminary degree. They typically have 20+ years of experience by the time they reach my age (mid-40’s).

My path has been a little different. I spent most of my 20’s in drug rehab–as a counselor, that is. I usually went to school on Mondays (working on my master’s degree at NOBTS) and worked Tuesday through Friday/Saturday at a drug treatment center in Birmingham, AL. I eventually moved to New Orleans to finish the before-mentioned degree (and spent more time in rehab there–yes, as a counselor). I invested the next season of my life (11 years) as a missionary in the Philippines.

I won’t rehash everything that happened when I returned to the United States with my wife (I’ve already written about that in my Life 3.0 post). I’ll just summarize it this way: it took us over three years to find my current place of ministry.

It’s been a full, blessed year since I became the pastor of Apollo Heights Baptist church. We celebrated this milestone with a high attendance Sunday today.

I decided to share a few reflections from this past year. I don’t claim that any of my observations are unique or original. Many of them, in fact, sound more like overused clichés.

Pastoring is a marathon, not a sprint.

I warned you about clichés, didn’t I?

But this one is certainly true of the pastorate. We’re a small church (around 80 worshipers on a typical Sunday), but it seemed to take a long time for me to learn everyone’s name. It has taken me a while to develop a “feel” for the different personalities in our congregation, but I’m still learning.  That’s just our church–it’s taking me even longer to figure out what “works” in our community in terms of outreach, etc. I think I might have Roberts Rules of Order figured out by the time I retire (maybe). You get the idea–I’m just scratching the surface after a year.

Change is hard.

I have a confession to make: I didn’t really want to be an agent of change during my first pastorate in the USA. I hoped to be more of a “game manager” (to use a football analogy) or a “maintenance” type leader. God had other plans. Our church has many strong points, but we really need to make some adjustments in order to more effectively reach our community. Studying Thom Rainer’s Autopsy of a Deceased Church helped us to see this. Leading us through some of these first steps has been challenging, but it has also been very rewarding.

You can’t please everyone.

“If you want to make everyone happy, don’t be a leader. Go sell ice cream.” -Eric Geiger

I always like to hear the bad news first so here goes: some people just can’t be pleased–including some “church people.” No need to go into details.

This probably would have bothered a younger version of me. But now I understand that trying to please everyone will paralyze a pastor/leader (or anyone else, for that matter). God has hopefully cured me of most of my people pleasing ways.

This quote also helps me keep things in perspective:

“If any man thinks ill of you, do not be angry with him, for you are worse than he thinks you to be.” – CH Spurgeon

God’s people are pretty amazing.

I’ve shared the bad news about people, but there’s really great news: watching God’s people at work is one of the greatest joys of being a pastor. I’m constantly amazed at the way our church members give, serve, and care. Many of our senior adults have inspired me by putting their own personal preferences aside for the sake of the gospel. For every disappointment there have been dozens of these “wow” moments, and it’s a beautiful thing.

“Without counsel plans fail, but with many advisers they succeed.” -Proverbs 15:22

“If you think you are leading, but no one is following, then you’re only taking a walk.” -John C. Maxwell

There’s something else I want to point out while I’m on this topic. I’ve had to ignore a few naysayers, but I know better than to disregard the godly wisdom that is available in our congregation. The advice from the mature saints in my church has been extremely valuable.

Love covers a multitude of sins

I’m sure I’ve made plenty of mistakes during this first year. My congregation has graciously overlooked them.

God is Faithful

This is the most important lesson from the past year, or the past 45 years, for that matter. God has proven Himself over and over. His mercies are new every morning, and His blessings are far greater than I’ll ever deserve.

Mare Cris and I are deeply grateful for the opportunity to serve and for an incredible year of ministry.

Life 3.0: Confessions of a Former Missionary

This post may get kind of long, so here’s the short version: I am gainfully employed!  I have begun my new job/ministry as senior pastor of Apollo Heights Baptist Church in El Paso, Texas.  Keep reading if you want the long version (over three years in the making).

Best laid plans

As many of you know, Mare Cris and I decided we would apply for her spousal visa and move to the USA after we married.  We were prepared to wait out the long (11-month) process together in the Philippines.  But neither of us realized just how long we’d wait for some sense of direction after arriving here.

I was interviewing with a church here in the States before we even left the Philippines (2013).   We had agreed to spend a week with them after we arrived here and enthusiastically took a (long) road trip with high hopes.  We assumed we’d be starting our new lives with me as pastor of that congregation.  Things with that church didn’t work out (long story), so it was back to square one.

I still believed God was calling me to be a pastor, so I took every imaginable step in pursuit of that goal.  I added to my theological library.  I read books and blogs for pastors.  I updated my resume and sent copies out nearly every day.  I (naively) assumed we’d find another church within a few weeks or months.

What happens in Asia . . .

Starting over has been a humbling experience.  My time in the Philippines was filled with all kinds of ministry opportunities: Bible study groups, speaking engagements, books, a radio show, interviews on radio and television, etc.  I still get speaking invitations from there via email (from those who don’t realize we’re no longer in the country).

But missionary experience is not what the typical pastor search team is looking for.  Most of them want candidates that have been staff members in the American church context for at least 5-10 years.  I’ve often joked that “missionary” carries about as much weight as “pizza delivery man” on a pastoral resume.

Supply, demand, and delays

I thought the ubiquity of the internet would make it easier for me to find a church, but I think it’s had the opposite effect: pastor search teams are now bombarded with hundreds of resumes if they advertise a vacancy online (one church recently informed me they had received 441 resumes, and I’m sure some receive more).  Starting out with a 1 in 400+ chance of getting selected is daunting to say the least.

I’m speaking from the perspective of a pastoral candidate, but I also have great sympathy for pastoral search teams: sifting through all these resumes must be an overwhelming task.

Then there’s the time issue: hiring a pastor is usually a 6-12 month process for the typical church (sometimes longer), so a vacancy doesn’t mean they will be making a choice right away.

Combine all these factors and you can imagine the outcome: months of sending resumes and waiting, interrupted by the occasional “God is leading us in a different direction” letter or email (I affectionately called these “dear John” letters).

Every once in a while I would receive a lengthy questionnaire from a church that wanted more information about me.  I would fill these out and return them as quickly as possible.  We even interviewed with another pastor search team in 2014 (in Alabama), but they decided to hire another candidate.

Rejection from all directions

As time went by I expanded my job search into more familiar territory.  I applied for a vacant position where I used to work as a drug abuse counselor before moving to the Philippines (a non-profit organization/ministry in Alabama).  I did good work for them and assumed that would give me some advantage.  I was wrong.   The first two times I applied I was interviewed, but not hired.  I was not even interviewed when I applied the third and fourth time.

2016

Mare Cris and I experienced another ministry search mishap early in February.  We thought we had found a perfect fit for us only to see it completely fall apart (another long story).  The experience was devastating for both of us.

A few more months passed without hearing anything new from pastor search teams.  Mare Cris and I made a decision not long after my 44th birthday: we would give up on vocational ministry if nothing happened by the end of June.  We had held on for so long, believing God was calling me to be a pastor.  But God’s only answer had come in the form of closed doors, so I was preparing to stop searching for a pastoral position.  We believed three years was long enough to wait.

A pastor search team did interview me (via Skype) in June.  We did really feel good about the interview but we weren’t sure how long we should wait for them.  Their timeline was “sometime before the end of the year”–not exactly what we were hoping to hear.

Mare Cris and I decided to plan a month-long visit to the Philippines not long after the June interview.  She had not seen her family in over three years, so it was time.  September seemed like a good month, so we made the arrangements.

I was going to go ahead with our plan to abandon vocational ministry if nothing positive happened by the time I returned to the States (we would still serve the Lord, of course, but I was planning to find another vocation other than full-time ministry).

Out of the Blue

I received an unexpected call on the morning of August 8th.  A representative from the Apollo Heights Baptist Church (El Paso, TX) called and asked if I would do a phone interview with them later that evening.  I had long forgotten sending them a resume so hearing from them was quite a surprise.

We spoke for a while that night and things went fairly well.  They called the next week and asked if Mare Cris and I would fly out and visit them before we went to the Philippines (the last weekend in August).

Our visit to El Paso went extremely well.  I was struck by the ethnic diversity of the church: black, white, Hispanic and Asians–all worshiping our Savior under one roof.  I’ve never seen so many ethnic groups represented in a church of this size (about 80-90 people).  I preached Sunday morning and shared my testimony Sunday evening.  We knew the church would be voting the following Wednesday and we left it in God’s hands.

We received a call Wednesday night (the night before we left for the Philippines).  The church voted and the overwhelming majority wanted me to be their pastor.  Mare Cris and I were a bit stunned by how quickly all of this happened.

Putting things in perspective

I should clarify something before I go any further.  I don’t want you to get the impression that the past 40 months have been all bad.  They haven’t.  Mare Cris has been able to meet and get to know my family (they love her almost as much as I do).  We’ve successfully navigated the visa process and are close to acquiring her US citizenship. God has given me several opportunities to preach at different congregations in the Birmingham area, and our time with these churches has been extremely encouraging.  God has also provided for every single financial need, even in the absence of a steady paycheck (needs including extensive dental work, fees for visa/citizenship processing, day-to-day expenses, and even helping family members back in the Philippines–I could write a whole blog post on His provisions).  He has richly blessed us in spite of all the uncertainty and disappointments.

But being in limbo for over three years has taken a severe emotional toll on both of us.  Sometimes we questioned our decision to move to the States.

From the Tropics to the Desert

Franklin Mountains

Franklin Mountains (the view from behind our house).

So here we are in El Paso, Texas–we packed up and moved soon after making it back to the States from our Philippines visit.  The palm trees of the Philippines and the pine trees of Alabama have been replaced with a majestic view of the Franklin Mountains. This is all unexpected, like many of the greatest blessings in my life. We are looking forward to this new journey and we covet your prayers.

When God Makes Diamonds

diamond

I preached from this passage in the Book of James a couple of weeks ago:

Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of various kinds, for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness. And let steadfastness have its full effect, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.
-James 1:2-4

I’m not sure why I felt drawn to the first chapter of James, but I suspect I my listeners needed to hear this encouragement.  I know I did–I felt like I was preaching to myself more than anyone in the congregation.

James presents an uncomfortable truth in this text:  there are some qualities God can only develop in us through trials.  Enduring these tests will give us perseverance (“steadfastness”), which will eventually result in maturity (“perfect and complete”).

I wish this wasn’t true–I wish there was some shortcut to being more Christlike and more dependent on the Lord.  But the experience of millions of believers (including yours truly) confirms what the Word of God teaches in this passage.

As I meditated on this text I started thinking about diamonds, which are some of the most precious stones in the world.  My mind wandered back to my whirlwind romance and my quest for the perfect engagement ring for Mare Cris.  I did a little research to get an idea of how these beautiful gemstones are made.  Geologists universally agree that diamonds are formed under crushing pressure and intense heat.

Think about that for a second: crushing pressure and intense heat.  God uses the most hostile conditions imaginable to create the world’s most exquisite and valuable objects.

He also uses trials and suffering to produce something of eternal value: a saint.  Please remember this if you are in the midst of a painful test.

The Ministry of Reminding

“I am fully convinced, my dear brothers and sisters, that you are full of goodness. You know these things so well you can teach each other all about them. Even so, I have been bold enough to write about some of these points, knowing that all you need is this reminder. . .  “ -Romans 15:14-15

One of the greatest joys I had in the Philippines was teaching the Scriptures to students who had never really studied them before.  I’d hand out copies of the New Testament and tell them the page number where they could find the passage we would study.  It was the first time many of them had experienced a simple, verse-by-verse discussion of God’s word with someone willing to answer their questions.

The same goes for my preaching ministry: I had to be careful about assuming my listeners knew anything about the text I would be sharing.  This was particularly true in some of the evangelistic preaching opportunities God gave me.

There was something extremely refreshing about doing ministry in this kind of setting.  What an amazing privilege!

This is not to say that Filipinos are biblically illiterate–there are thousands of faithful believers there who diligently study the Bible.  But my ministry was focused more on those who were new to the faith.

My ministry took an ironic turn here in the States.  I’ve had the privilege of preaching (short-term) in three churches.  All three congregations were of an older demographic: the average attendee had probably been listening to sermons since before I was born.

“What can I share that they haven’t already heard many times before?”  I asked myself this question as I embarked on this new season of ministry.

God taught me something very important: I don’t have to teach/preach anything “new.”   I’m not saying God lead me to “recycle” old sermon outlines from C.H. Spurgeon.  Preaching, after all, is applying the timeless truths of Scripture to our modern context.  But I realized that preaching is a ministry of reminding for many of us who have had already learned the basics doctrines of the faith.

Don’t get me wrong: I’m always learning new things when I prepare for (or listen to) sermons.  But I’ve let go of the need to hear “I’ve never heard anything like that before” when I preach. I’m just as content to know I have reminded my listeners of things we need to hear over and over again.  Here are a few examples that quickly come to mind:KevinSRC

  • It’s not about us.
  • We can trust God.
  • Life is fleeting.
  • God expects obedience.
  • We are forgiven in Christ.

The list goes on and on, but you get the idea.  We need to constantly hear the gospel preached because we are a forgetful people.  I’m thankful for the ministry of reminding–both as a preacher and hearer of God’s word.